For nature lovers

Hiking on the Rennsteig Trail across the peaks of the Thuringian Forest or cycling through the lovely Ilm river valley: in Thuringia’s nature you can take a deep breath and get away from your everyday worries. You walk through quiet nature parks, perhaps discover a spotted salamander near a cool mountain stream or enjoy the scent of flowering herb meadows. 

Which treasure of nature do you want to discover?

When you can't hear much for a change

The sound of the Rennsteig Trail

As you’re walking along, it takes a while to realise that you can’t hear much for a change. Except for the buzzing of bees, the wind in the canopy and your own footsteps. It’s a quiet, but by no means uneventful tour from Oberhof to Allzunah.
Mountainbiker auf dem Rennsteig-Radweg im Thüringer Wald
The Rennsteig Cycle Path

Balancing on the mountain ridge

The Rennsteig is not just a hiking trail but also a delightful cycle path. It balances on the ridge of the Thuringian Forest and offers mountain bikers a secluded area with natural trails and rapid descents.
Bienenwiese auf Schloss Tonndorf
Cycling in the Ilm valley

Bees in a sea of blossoms

Rambling roses and old fruit trees are a common sight in the middle valley of the Ilm river, which flows at a leisurely pace past rolling hills, idyllic villages and meadows buzzing with bees – perfect for a laid-back cycling trip.
The SaaleHorizontale walking trail

A great walk with great views

The evening sun peeks out from beneath the clouds, bathing Jena in a soft red glow. All of a sudden, the rain of the day is forgotten. A warm gust of wind carries with it the beautiful sound of singing from below: Dutch singer Caro Emerald is giving a concert in the theatre square on this Friday evening in July.
The Saale Cycle Route – from dramatic to idyllic

Of wishes and dishes

A lucky skywalk, party time by the river and a night in a shiny caravan – all this and more awaits along the Saale Cycle Route.
Primeval forest on the doorstep

The treetop trail in Hainich National Park

Ever wondered what a primeval forest looks like from above? Find out on the treetop trail in Hainich National Park. But hang on a minute, a primeval forest in the heart of Thuringia? Don’t worry, you won’t need to channel your inner Indiana Jones and battle your way through a jungle. Comfortable shoes and a sense of adventure are all you need for this memorable trip.
Blick auf die Hohenwarte-Talsperre in Thüringen
The Hohenwarte Reservoir Trail

Walking around the 'Thuringian Sea'

Europe’s largest continuous reservoir region is located in the Thuringian Slate Mountains/Upper Saale nature park. With its large expanses of water surrounded by dense forests it is reminiscent of Scandinavian fjords. The locals fondly refer to this area as the ‘Thuringian Sea’. And right at the heart of it is the Hohenwarte Reservoir Trail – a highly memorable 74.4 kilometre walking route.
Thüringer Freilichtmuseum Hohenfelden
A visit to a village in the Weimarer Land region

History through the lens of the home

Imagine a small village where no one lives. The houses have all the fixtures and fittings, but the inhabitants have gone. Vanished into thin air.
Thüringer Bergbahn im Schwarzatal
The Thuringian Mountain Railway

Take the funicular into herb country

A real treasure for historical railway enthusiasts and nature lovers awaits in the wild and romantic Schwarza valley. The fully electrified Oberweissbach funicular railway has been serving the region since the early 20th century. In summer, an open-top carriage allows you to savour the fresh woodland air and enjoy the breeze on your face, while the ‘natural remedy train’ provides an interactive introduction to Thuringia’s herb country.
Buchenwald im Hainich
Woodland going wild again

UNESCO World Heritage Hainich National Park

What would the world look like without us? If there weren’t any people, just nature, completely untouched. Beech trees as far as the eye can see, the air filled with a fungal, earthy aroma. The Hainich region is one of the last remnants of the ancient woodland that once covered large swathes of central Europe. At around 130 square kilometres, it is Germany’s largest unbroken area of deciduous forest. Its southern section is a national park, which became part of the UNESCO World Heritage Primeval Beech Forests of the Carpathians and Ancient Beech Forests of Germany in 2011. Although at first glance its natural landscape might not seem quite as spectacular as chalk cliffs, coral reefs or canyons, it is nevertheless unique and provides a very special habitat for many rare species.

It’s all about the journey – the Rennsteig Trail